Coordinating Curricula and User Preferences to Increase Participation of Women & Students of Color in Engineering

Sharon Tettegah, PhD
CBSR Director

Portrait of Sharon Tettegah

For several decades, academic institutions have received financial resources to broaden participation in engineering programs. Despite these funded recruitment and retention efforts, most engineering programs have achieved little improvement in the participation of women, students of color, individuals with disabilities, and other underrepresented groups. One hypothesis to explain this discrepancy is that the low representation of women and students of color in engineering results from the lack of accessibility of engineering curricula. To test this hypothesis, this project seeks to study engineering curricula and student preferences. Based on those results, it aims to develop a set of curriculum guidelines and models that may increase the alignment between engineering curricula and students' expectations and preferences for learning. These results have the potential to broaden participation of women and students of color in engineering.

NSF funded #1826632

an Examination of the Relationship Between Identity and Academic Achievement in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) in Black Undergraduate Students at HSIs

Sharon Tettegah, PhD
CBSR Director

This multi-institutional study examines the relationship between identity and academic achievement in STEM involving Black Undergraduate Students at HSIs. We seek to determine the degree to which science identity is predictive of academic achievement. The primary objectives of the study are to determine the degree to which identity among Black undergraduate students in STEM courses is predictive of academic achievement and identify which social and personal attributes may contribute to the development of a positive identity in academically proficient students. Intersectionality will be used as a methodological lens to understand the intersections between multiple identities and STEM academic achievement.

Close-up of two students in a science lab